8 Steps for Dealing with Digital Extortion

August 24, 2015 Rami Essaid

Recently, the CEO of a business received an email from an extortionist group known as DD4BC, notifying him that his company’s Web sites would face a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack if he didn’t pay 50 Bitcoins to the attackers within 24 hours.

This was a relatively low-stakes crime; the value of the online currency the attackers were initially demanding equates to about $11,500. But the attackers threatened to increase the amount and launch a “long-term attack” if the CEO ignored the threats.

And for most companies, the risk of not paying this kind of extortion could be really high. Businesses rely on their websites performing at full capacity every hour of the day and every day of the year. For sites to be down or slow for even brief periods can be extremely costly.

Fortunately, there are steps organizations can take to handle digital extortion incidents.

Read the Article

About the Author

Rami Essaid

Rami Essaid is the Chief Product and Strategy Officer and Co-founder of Distil Networks, the first easy and accurate way to identify and police malicious website traffic, blocking 99.9% of bad bots without impacting legitimate users. With over 12 years in telecommunications, network security, and cloud infrastructure management, Rami continues to advise enterprise companies around the world, helping them embrace the cloud to improve their scalability and reliability while maintaining a high level of security.

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