The Boss vs. the Bad Bots: More Laws Aren’t the Answer to Ticket Scalpers

June 14, 2016

Ticket vendors using shadowy computer programs scooped up good seats for Springsteen — and Adele, Foo Fighters and the Pope — and put them up for resale at huge markups.

Bruce Springsteen fans were thrilled when he announced a 2016 concert tour ... until they tried to get tickets and discovered who’s really The Boss. Ticket vendors using shadowy computer programs called bots scooped up good seats within seconds and put them up for resale at huge markups.

Bots are everywhere

Bots carried out 74 billion interactions with websites in 2015. It’s amazing to consider that human activity accounted for 54 percent of traffic on the internet last year while bots weren’t far behind at 46 percent, according to an annual analysis by my company, Distil Networks, of the sources and types of bot attacks.

Bots aren’t all malicious electronic vermin. In fact, 60 percent of them are "good bots" that deliver useful services such as search engine indexing, stock trade execution, airfare discount notifications, news updates and weather alerts.

But the rest — 40 percent — are able to mimic human behavior and perform an array of nefarious activities, from denial of service attacks to unauthorized data gathering to spam and automated scalping.

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About 40% of all Bots are Malicious, Security Firm Says
About 40% of all Bots are Malicious, Security Firm Says

VentureBeat reports that about 40% of all Bots are Malicious according to Distil Networks.

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